Together Wines

When commercial helicopter pilot Euan decided to combine his trade with his new found passion for growing food, he and his young family landed in Far North Queensland where he took a job crop spraying.  After one day on the new job, it was immediately apparent that this sort of practice was actually not about growing the sort of crops he would want anything to do with.

Euan and Carlin

Together – Euan and Carlin

A short stint in a vineyard outside Canberra before this had ‘wet’ his appetite for the art of winemaking, and after leaving Queensland, three years in Margaret River helped Euan complete his study of viticulture and oenology at Curtin University. Having family connections and fond memories of the NSW South Coast, Euon, his wife Carlin and their two young daughters then went in search of somewhere to plant their own roots.

Carlin and winter pinot.

Carlin and winter pinot.

Beautifully biodynamic soil...

Grass up to the base of the vines forces the vine’s roots deeper down into the ground. The grass also uses excess water in wet times and when times are dry it is slashed to keep it low.

Together Wines found its home at Verona, just south of Cobargo, and plans for the planting of 2500 vines got under way.  In keeping with Rudolph Steiner’s biodynamic principles, 800mm holes were dug and then left open for almost a year. Once the soil had been exposed to the weather and sunshine for that time, each hole was filled with humus rich soil, enhanced with biodynamic preparations, and in August 2010, the vines were installed into their earthly pots.

Strong and sturdy.

Strong and sturdy after 5 years.

Five different varieties were planted including Pinot Noir, Sangiovese, Shiraz, Mataro and Sauvignon Blanc varieties.  Although advised against Pinot Noir by the ‘experts’, Euan and Carlin have found that these devigoured vines are producing the best quantity and quality fruit, and there are plans afoot to plant even more.

The farm's biodynamics flow form.

The farm’s biodynamics flow form.

Biodynamic Brew!

Biodynamic Brew!

Biodynamics is a regenerative growing technique that uses preps to enable the soil to optimise it’s own performance in managing mineral availability, disease resistance and water holding capacity.  These carefully considered and prescribed preparations are sprayed onto the soil and crops as required when problems are identified.

The prep. spraying rig.

The prep. spraying rig.

Euan and Carlin have found that they have rarely needed to irrigate their vines, even through the driest months, and close observation and careful trials have enabled them to custom their spraying from season to season.  By getting to know their vines, they are learning to support nature’s own unsurpassed ability to know how to thrive.

Jaffa in the veggie garden.

Jaffa in the veggie garden.

Bananas warm against the silo.

Bananas warm against the silo.

Of course, once chemical inputs, and high levels of soluble ‘stimulants’ are used, such as with industrial agriculture, nature loses it’s way. Not here. Thoughtful, sustainable practices are the nature of Together Wines.

Beautiful barrels....

Beautiful barrels….

Highly recommended Sauvignon Blanc 2014

Highly recommended Sauvignon Blanc 2014

And the result of these wholesome practices? Well, I have to confess that the writer just had to have a taste – even though it was not long since breakfast – a red and a white, and they were delicious.  I’m no buff, but I’d like another glass please…..

A tasting...

A tasting…

As a result of a visit to the Winery by the River Cottage Australia crew in April, Together Wines first blend was born: Paddock Blend Rose. A combination of the Sangiovese, Shiraz and Mataro this blend created a bit of a sensation among the cast and crew, so keep an eye out for it once the Property’s new Winery is completed later in 2016 – you can follow the progress of this exciting development on Facebook.

Evan and the scientific side...

Euan and the scientific side…

A vintage

All Together now – a vintage

It’s still going out on a limb to grow things a bit differently in Australia, and certainly in my experience there’s no shortage of people who’ll tell you, “It won’t work.” But the gentle, self assured confidence Euan and Carlin have in the practices at Together Wines is undoubtedly worth bottling.

The duck pond

The duck pond

For more inspiration, see Instagram. Cheers! XO

Lets get Frank….

Frank and his son Michael have been running a local sawmill on top of a hill just West of Bermagui for over 30 years. But in recent times, the demand from the local community for growing has outstripped the call for cutting down. They are transforming their timber mill by surrounding it with lush and productive gardens producing seriously good veggies for sale.

Frank and his ribbons

Frank and some of his Cobargo Show awards.

Frank and Michael enter the best of their produce in the Cobargo Show each year. There’s actually a pile of award cards in Frank’s hands above, and if you look closely, along with great veg, the ribbon over Frank’s left shoulder is for “Best Packet Cake” – versatile guy.

Michael with some new plantings.

Michael with some new plantings.

Snails and other pests are apparently not a problem, and if something comes along it’s manually removed and squished before it gets out of control. Lots of bird life helps with pests, and companion planting, and rotating different plantings are, “….you know, just common sense,” confide the gently spoken pair.

The mill track

The mill track

Totally organic, the only input into the vegetable gardens at Frank’s is some saw dust, and loads of cow manure. In fact the soil is amazingly full of organic matter, and free of pest and disease.  I suspect the hill top position with great drainage and fresh South Coast air flow all around helps the garden to thrive as well.

View from the hill.

View from the hill.

Michael’s yellow tomatoes are famous in town, as well as at the Bermagui Markets each Thursday afternoon, and just as sweet and juicy as their more popular red cousins.

Frank and Michael.

Frank and Michael.

Frank might say growing good food is ‘common sense’, but not many would agree with that.  Those who’ve given it a go know it takes planning, caring, thoughtfulness, passion, dedication and lots and lots of hard work.

Tomato abundance.

Tomato abundance.

In fact, it’s like any flourishing marriage I suppose.  With their incredible humility, I have no doubt that Frank and Michael’s successful relationship with the food they’re growing is all about commitment and patience.

Bringing the bees.

Bringing the bees.

…and it’s beautiful to witness….

Pumpkin hiding.

Pumpkin hiding.

….and not very common at all really. XO

A special Aude autumn

I should never leave it so long for an update here – too much going on! March brought with it a very special visitor from France, and so many wonderful events, we’ve barely sat still.   So here is a photographic summary, starting with the harvest of our beautiful (if only ornamental) corn…

Corn Painted Mountain

Corn Painted Mountain

…the beginning of the wonderful John Blundon’s passionate restoration of our century old shed…

Stage 1 of shed renovation

Stage 1. Removal of the west wall to reinforce the stumps, jack up the bowed frame and trim and replace the enormous wall panels.

…the very well attended, inaugural monthly Cobargo/Quaama Food Swap at the beautiful home and garden of River and Tammy…

Fabulous coloured carrots

Fabulous coloured carrots

Fabulous Food Swappers!

Food Swappers!

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The super resourceful Cornelia showing off banana leaves and fresh lemon grass, (and you should try her home made Indian style ice cream…OMG!)

…a first experience with fresh roasted chestnuts…

Peeling roasted chestnuts for creating creamy chestnut soup (Tilba Jersey creamy of course!), French style - amazing!

Aude peeling roasted chestnuts for creating creamy chestnut soup (Tilba Jersey cream of course!), French style – delish!

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and experimenting with stir fried kale, Bangalay Bend garlic and roasted chestnuts – tasty and super nutritious.

…a visit to the Tilba Jersey Dairy…

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Our friend Aude enjoyed visiting an Australian dairy, having grown up on her family’s dairy in France. The difference between here and there? Apparently nothing. (Do cows ‘moo’ in French?)

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Heading back to the paddock after milking

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Waiting for spilt milk

…the sharing of abundance by Gary and Francis from The Rusty Fig Winery

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Tom and Aude crushing grapes ‘au naturel’.

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The resulting syrupy sweet juice from the chambourcin grapes – yum!

…a lesson on harnessing heavy horses for field work…

David and his Belle

David in the Yowrie Valley, with his Shire horse, Belle, in training for work.

Tom walking behind Belle in her harness - practicing for the real thing one day.

Tom walking behind the young Belle in her harness – practicing for the real thing. One day she will pull the cart and furrow.

…a crash course in evaporative distillation…

David loading the still.

David loading the still with Eucalyptus leaves.

David's still

Showing off his handiwork – although he has commercial grade, stainless equipment, David loves to use the still he built himself.

"....and the oil/water mix comes out here..."

“….and the oil/water mix comes out here…” David sells his pure Eucalyptus and Lavender oils around the district, including at Sweet Home Cobargo.

…a great big Diamond Python in our trees, and not-so-welcome slithery visitor in the chook house…

Red Belly Black visitor

Red Belly Black

…and Aude’s leaven creating beautiful loaves and Easter Buns.

Aude's first lovely loaf.

Aude’s first lovely loaf.

So now as April draws to a close and we are lighting the fire, and the growth of the grass (and weeds), starts to slow, we are reflecting on, and enormously grateful for the abundance of good food, good people and good learning.  Some people leave a lasting warmth and impression though, and although she has moved on, we all really miss Aude.

Cobargo Farm

Cobargo Farm is a pleasure garden and working farm located on the Bermagui Road, just outside the historic town of Cobargo on the Far South Coast, about 10 minutes drive from Feast Farm. Three generations of the Holloway and Doolin families help run this farm and last Saturday October 5th was the third time they have held an open day to showcase the amazing job they do.

Cobargo Farm sells at the gate 7 days from dawn 'till dusk.

Cobargo Farm sales always welcome.

Janet heads up the hard working team at the farm where they produce an enormous variety of seasonal fruit and vegetables, raise pigs, chooks and cattle, and keep bees, ducks and sheep. All of this bounty is beautifully laid out around the homestead, shady established trees, a spring fed creek and dams, and flower gardens, including a large collection of roses.

Cobargo Farm

Cobargo Farm

The Open Day was as much about showcasing the local community as it was about getting to stroll around and enjoy the Farm itself. There were dozens of stalls laid out on the lawns, each showcasing the talents and productivity of this vibrant region.

CWA Hospitality

CWA Hospitality

Along with sheep shearing, bee keeping, and spinning, the Galba Forge was one of the demonstrations you could watch, and the unique form of blacksmithing practiced by Hans Schippi was mesmerising to watch. How you can take a piece of metal and wrought it into beautiful, natural looking pieces that are not only artistic, but beautifully functional, is inspiring. Of course, mostly the Open Day was about food- although a great band played on the deck overlooking the rose garden and their cruisy music pervaded the entire garden, along with the smell of the Lions Club sausage sizzle. Alfred and Jane’s Cobargo home made ice cream was a stand out for us too!

Cobargo Farm

Cobargo Farm

We haven’t lived here for very long at all, but I have to say it feels different to anywhere else I’ve ever lived. I guess this is the ‘real’ country here, as opposed to the peri-urban fringe farming areas which are commutable from a capital city. It has a very different feel. A strong sense of community, I suppose because people genuinely rely on each other so much more from day-to-day. Lots of things you take for granted in, or near a big city may not be available (especially services), have to be ordered in advance, then take longer to arrive and possibly cost more.

Perfect hat for this gorgeous day in the garden!

Perfect hat for this gorgeous day in the garden!

But, as Janet and her family would no doubt agree, those problems become insignificant compared to the benefits. You don’t just visit here, you choose to escape, and immerse yourself in a different way of life.

Further-a-field…

At Warwick Park in Foxground, the beds have finally dried out a bit, and the vegies are mostly none-the-worst for the months of drenching rain. The mixed winter green crop of oats, vetch and mustard has flourished!

Our oat green crop devouring children!

Our oat green crop devouring children!

During a Foodscape Tours visit a couple of weeks ago, we picked our first baby parsnips – small, but a sign of yummy things to come. This was Feast Farms last visit from Jacqueline and her guests, as the Warwick Park garden has now been handed over to Bonnie Cassen of Sharwood Greens. Bonnie will continue to host visitors and supply wholesome, fresh vegies to Green Box & local restaurants in the area. Have fun Bonnie, and we look forward to watching the garden flourish, and sharing vegie growing tips and stories!

Jac and baby parsnips

Jac and baby parsnips

Meanwhile, we have been exploring further South in search of larger paddocks to till. The South Coast is such a ‘hidden treasure’…..so many beautiful, character-rich villages from Milton, down through Moruya, to one of my very favourites, Bodalla. Beautiful forests, stunning coastline, flourishing arts communities and cottage industries everywhere. So many experiences to soak up and flavours to savour!

Pumpkin harvest

Cobargo pumpkin harvest

The contrast between the rural heritage of Tilba Tilba one minute, a pretty 10 minute drive through spotted gum forests later and you’re watching seals sunning themselves on the breakwater as fishing boats bob up and down gently in Bermagui Harbour. Irresistible really!

Small town eats

Delicious local Cobargo offerings…

Back in Berry, husband and wife team John Evans and Sonia Greig have now opened their awesome new restaurant “SOUTH on Albany“. John does a great job sourcing many local, seasonal ingredients for their simple modern menu influenced by chef John’s Welsh background and European training. The menu is accompanied by a fantastic wine list again offering many wines from the local region. A ‘must visit’ for a fresh, delicious, seasonal meal.